ACTION ALERTS

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FYI, By the way the latest from Laila Yaghi, mother of Ziyad Yaghi

O.K so Ziyad is back in Florida and to all the people who promised to write him, here is his address:

Ziyad Yaghi (51771-056)
USP Coleman 2
P.O Box 1034
Coleman, FL 33521

https://www.facebook.com/lailayaghi

http://www.freeziyadyaghi.blogspot.com/

http://freeziyadyaghi.info/index.htm

 

https://twitter.com/freeziyadyaghi

 

http://www.petitiononline.com/GVFJAHR/petition.html

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Free Ziyad Yaghi

Hear the voice of his mother, Laila Yaghi Ziyad Yaghi, a teenager no more than 19 went to visit his family but the FBI decided to use this for their own gain and indicted my son and his friend with charges …
after almost 3 years from coming back from overseas!
The charges are that they went overseas to kill people!
Ziyad was to go to College just before they arrested him! All three defendants were convicted on Thursday October 13, 2011. Though charged with conspiring to commit jihad overseas,
Omar Aly Hassan was found not guilty of that charge.
But he was convicted of providing material support to terrorists.
Yaghi and Sherifi were convicted on both counts
(Providing material support to terrorists and conspiring to commit jihad overseas).

Ziyad Yaghi: Sentenced to 31.5 years in prison
Mohammad Omar Aly Hassan: Sentenced to 15 years in prison

I Want People to Understand
by Laila Yaghi [ 11 April 2012 ]
understand.htm
Dare to be a Muslim in America
by Laila Yaghi [ 27 January 2012 ]
dare.htm
7 YouTube videos
Laila Yaghi
yt.htm
Poems
by Laila Yaghi
poems.htm
Please help with the legal costs
Send a money order or check to :
Laila Yaghi
PO Box 37967
Raleigh NC 27627-7967

OR

Donate by PayPal  

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See also Late 2011, and Early 2012 News about

Sentences – Appeals – News > HERE

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On Friday Jan 13 2012,

Where
Judge Louise W. Flanagan’s Court Room, United States Courthouse 413 Middle Street New Bern NC

the court will issue the sentences, and of course there will be appeals for the sensationalism used by the prosecutors, and secret evidence, old accusations, emotional appeals, etc, etc, in the case.

Stay tuned

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A article about the ongoing court case

What constitutes terrorism? 

by Aaron Lake Smith

 

Over the next two months, a federal jury will try to make sense of what John Mueller, co-author of Terror, Security, and Money, calls “easily the most confusing terror case since 9/11.” Three young Muslim men from the Triangle have been charged with providing material support to terrorist organizations and conspiring with another local man, Daniel Boyd, to commit acts of terrorism overseas.

Since 9/11, it has been very rare for defendants to plead not guilty and to choose to stand trial in U.S. terrorist prosecutions. The upcoming trial could provide an opportunity to learn more about the defendants’ motivations—and could shed light on the federal government’s questionable use of FBI informants in building terrorism cases.

“The vast majority of these cases are plea-bargained. Most of these cases don’t go to trial so you don’t get that insight into the process and things that were being said,” explained David Schanzer, director of the Triangle Center on Terrorism and Homeland Security and a professor at Duke University. “These guys are going to testify, we’re going to hear interesting things about the radicalization process.”

Given the U.S. government’s successful record in prosecuting terrorism trials, the odds that the defendants can avoid conviction are slim. A study of these trials by New York University’s Center on Law and Security found a 92 percent conviction rate in the top 50 alleged plots since 9/11. And the Triangle defendants will be tried just one week after the 10th anniversary of 9/11, so jurors’ sensitivity to security and terrorism issues could be heightened.

Prosecuting attorneys will argue that the men are guilty of providing “material support” to terrorists and engaging in a conspiracy to plan attacks on targets overseas. The terrorist acts, according to court documents, are vaguely worded, alleging that the men planned to “murder, kidnap, injure or maim” people abroad, possibly in Israel. Meanwhile, the defense could argue that the men were just young, blustering, anti-establishment Muslims who got mixed up with the wrong guy.

That wrong guy is Daniel Patrick Boyd, a tall, blonde, 40-year-old Muslim who also goes by the nickname “Saifullah,” or “sword of God.” A young convert to Islam, Boyd tested his faith by traveling to Afghanistan in the early ’90s to fight alongside the mujahideen. In 1991, he and his brother, Charles, were accused of robbing a bank in Pakistan and narrowly avoided getting an arm and a leg cut off in accordance with Pakistani law. (The bank robbery charges turned out to be bogus.) The two brothers fled back to the U.S., and Boyd and his wife, Sabrina, also a devout Muslim, moved to a quiet cul-de-sac in Willow Spring, outside Fuquay-Varina, to raise their five children.

Boyd started a contracting company and also ran a small halal grocery store in Garner called Blackstone Market, which served as a meeting place for local Muslims. Friends and neighbors have told the Associated Press that he had “good moral character,” and was the kind of guy who “would help anyone with anything.” The AP also quoted one neighbor as saying, “If he’s a terrorist, then he’s the nicest terrorist I’ve ever met in my life.”

Despite having fought with the mujahideen, Boyd didn’t fit the profile of the terrorist ringleader. “In most terror cases you have a couple of young guys, college age, who hate the United States and policy in the Middle East,” said Mueller, a professor specializing in national security studies at Ohio State University. “They don’t seem very responsible or coherent. They often have criminal records.

“What’s strange about Boyd is his age and his respectability in the community,” Mueller went on. “He ran a business and is a family man. He’s had these adventures overseas but it’s not clear if he had any real connections abroad. All these things he said, he could have just been a blowhard.”

The FBI apparently didn’t think so. Agents had been watching Boyd since 2005; it appears that the Boyd family was aware of the surveillance. Dylan Boyd, also a devout Muslim, was later arrested with his father. In an FBI interview after his arrest, he said that helicopters flew over the Boyd home so often that the family joked about painting a peace sign on the roof.

Daniel Boyd began hearing rumors about himself in the community, according to testimony by Dylan Boyd, who stated that “his father was concerned about some kids in Raleigh who had gotten in trouble and might be saying they were involved with [him].”

So Daniel Boyd took the initiative to set up a meeting with FBI agents at a chain bookstore in Cary. His sons, Dylan and Zak, tagged along, terrified that the agents would take their father away.

On July 27, 2009, agents arrested Boyd, Dylan and Zak, who were both in their early 20s, on charges of providing material support to terrorists and conspiring to kidnap and injure people overseas. They also faced various weapons charges, including selling firearms to a known felon.

That same day, while searching the family home, agents unearthed a trove of potential evidence: dozens of automatic weapons, 27,000 rounds of ammunition, newspaper clippings about the Sept. 11 attacks as well as books and posters exhorting Islamic armed struggle and jihad.

Some of the charges were based on FBI informant testimony against Boyd and the alleged co-conspirators, who reportedly engaged in “military training” with Kalishnikov assault rifles in rural Caswell County. In one dramatic scene, Daniel Boyd allegedly points an AK-47 at a law enforcement helicopter and asks his son to get some ammo, according to informant testimony. In another incident, Boyd allegedly sees several military men getting out of a Humvee and says, “We should take them out. They’re overseas fighting our brothers.”

Yet a recent Mother Jones investigation raised ethical questions about the FBI’s use of informants in homegrown terror cases. The FBI spends $3.3 billion annually on counterterrorism, and employs up to 15,000 informants, many of whom are watching Muslim communities.

“You have these informants wandering around mosques asking questions, probing them, trying to identify radicals—at some point it’s just probing,” Mueller said.

The informants in these cases frequently have some unsavory criminal history or have been persuaded to cooperate with the FBI because they’re facing deportation. In some investigations, the informants have gone so far as to supply rockets, large amounts of cash and fake detonators to individuals who they think might have an inclination toward violence. The key prosecutable conversations between the informants and the suspects are often half-recorded, and sometimes not recorded at all.

“Law professors believe that the conversation should be recorded from the very beginning,” Mueller said. “The very first suggestion has to come from the defendant. In some recordings from these kinds of cases, you never know whether the initial idea was the informant’s idea or the defendant’s idea.”

Dylan Boyd met two of the defendants, Omar Hassan and Ziyad Yaghi, while he was enrolled at N.C State University. Around that time, Yaghi and Hassan started visiting the Boyd household to drink tea and talk about deen, or faith.

Much of the government’s case against Omar Hassan and Ziyad Yaghi rests on a mysterious trip to Israel that the men took in 2007 with Daniel and Zak Boyd. The indictment asserts that the trip was a thwarted attempt at “violent jihad.”

Hassan and Yaghi both gave Daniel Boyd cash to buy them plane tickets to Tel Aviv (why they didn’t buy their own tickets is unclear). Their plane was scheduled to arrive in Tel Aviv a day after the Boyds arrived.

However, when the Boyds got to Israel, they were detained at the airport and questioned for two days before being promptly deported. A day later, Hassan and Yaghi were also denied entry into Israel. Both groups of men subsequently traveled to Jordan. From the evidence, it does not appear that they met.

After a couple of days, Dylan Boyd flew to Jordan to meet his father and brother, as planned. In an FBI interview, Dylan said they had no plan of connecting with Yaghi and Hassan. The Boyds claimed they were making a pilgrimage to Islamic holy places. Meanwhile, Yaghi and Hassan spent the rest of the month vacationing in Jordan and Egypt, where they both have family. When they returned home to the U.S., it seems that Yaghi and Hassan became estranged from the Boyd family. In an FBI interview Dylan Boyd said he hadn’t seen or spoken to Yaghi and Hassan since the 2007 trip.

The prosecution also hopes to capitalize on Yaghi’s and Hassan’s spotty criminal records. Yaghi was convicted of stealing copper wire in Texas, and Hassan was charged with assaulting his girlfriend as the couple drove around Cary. Both men were also involved in an altercation with a former friend over $70.

Similarly, Hysen Sherifi’s fate rests on what he was doing in Kosovo in 2008. That summer, after allegedly giving Daniel Boyd $500 “for the sake of Allah,” Sherifi departed the U.S. for the town of Pristina with large amounts of cash. Sherifi’s lawyer said in a court hearing that he went because his wife lives there and she was pregnant with their first child. He also has other family in Kosovo. When Sherifi returned to the U.S., he allegedly told an FBI informant that he had been “trying to go to the beach.” The FBI says that “going to the beach” was a code phrase for “waging violent jihad.” A later search of Sherifi’s home in Raleigh yielded books with titles including Call to Jihad.

The idea of jihad figures prominently in the prosecution’s case. Daniel Boyd and Anes Subasic talked about old cars, a conversation the FBI says was actually about “violent jihad.”

In a subsequent indictment, federal prosecutors allege that Daniel Boyd and Sherifi planned to attack the Quantico Marine Base outside Washington, D.C. In court documents, the FBI says that Sherifi and Boyd went to Quantico with maps to conduct “reconnaissance” and that Boyd had a weapon that he referred to as “for the base.” An FBI informant alleged that Boyd said that if he didn’t leave the country soon he was going to “make jihad right here in America.”

Imran Aukhil, spokesman for the Islamic Center of Raleigh, explained that the word jihad has many meanings, including a struggle within one’s own faith. “Jihad is a very important term in Muslim life. It means struggle, and that struggle is not necessarily a physical outward struggle. The most common form of jihad is the struggle within oneself to avoid temptations and to reduce carnal lust and desires.”

Last February, Daniel Boyd signed a plea bargain, admitting to the major charges. As part of the plea deal, which included a dismissal of the Quantico Marine base charge, he’s expected to testify against the remaining defendants. Now that his sons, Dylan and Zak Boyd, have plead guilty, all of the indicted family members have admitted to conspiracy.

“The question is: Where does the conspiracy begin and end? You’ve got a group that’s involved and some people are going to be more involved than others,” said Schanzer of the Triangle Center on Terrorism and Homeland Security.

John Mueller told the Indy that the Boyds likely plead guilty to avoid receiving the maximum sentence.

However, in doing so, they, along with the prosecution, are shielded from publicly disclosing some information. It is uncertain if FBI informants will testify at next week’s trial.

According to Charles Kurzman, UNC sociology professor and the author of a new book on Islamic terrorism, The Missing Martyrs, “One of the unfortunate aspects is that when there’s a guilty plea or a plea bargain, then we don’t get to see all that evidence. They admit in vague terms to doing something, but not what they did and how they planned to do it.”

In Missing Martyrs, Kurzman describes how big-talk, radical young Muslims differ from Islamists with concrete plans to commit violence. Kurzman told the Indy, “Young people do sometimes pose for causes they think are cool and anti-establishment. Some young people say they support bin Laden because he’s an anti-imperialist, anti-establishment figure in much the same way that other young people say they support Che Guevara—even though they know nothing of his ideology.”

Kurzman recommends withholding judgment until the trial is over. “In all of these cases, you have to adopt a wait-and-see attitude. Some of the cases crumble at trial, and in others the evidence is far more serious than we first learned.”

Imran Aukhil, of the Islamic Center of Raleigh, echoed the sentiment. “The Boyds left the Islamic Center on their own terms. But the others have plead not guilty. They believe that they’re innocent, and the Muslim community will stand behind them until and unless they are proven guilty.”

by Aaron Lake Smith

http://www.indyweek.com/indyweek/what-constitutes-terrorism/Content?oid=2655475

Note one of the comments

Is this the same FBI that cannot find fraud in the ongoing financial crimes on Wall Street for the past 15-20 years? Is this the same FBI who sets up protesters at political conventions, infiltrates their groups and steals all of their cameras and equipment? Is this the same FBI that hates white collar crime and avoids it like the plague? Is this the FBI of J. Edgar Hoover, noted homosexual and tutu wearer, also sociopath and psychopath?

Why yes, this is also the FBI which sets up preemptive stings to lure young idiots into charges like “contributing to terrorism”. This is the FBI which has worked like hell to extend the title “terrorism” to every possible petty larceny even at the local level because the rules of evidence are so very low and they want to get their conviction rate up.

And what about the billion dollar scams and threats to all of us by banksters? Well, the FBI doffs its hat to those folks and helps them cross the street – why – because banksters own congress, which authorizes FB I budgets. It is all that simple, a matter of staying busy and justifying the Patriot act under which they can do most anything illegal under cover of something to do with “terrorism”. Wonder why they are not more aggressive on rightwing terrorist groups? Well, again lots of rightwing congressmen.

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Thursday OCT 13 2011

From the news articles:

Appeals will be made:

North Carolina men convicted of conspiring to aid militants

  • Print
By Ned Barnett

RALEIGH, North Carolina | Thu Oct 13, 2011 8:23pm EDT

(Reuters) – A federal jury found three North Carolina men guilty on Thursday of conspiring to provide material support to Islamist militants in foreign countries.

The jury heard three weeks of testimony and deliberated over two days in New Bern before rendering the guilty verdicts against Mohammad Omar Aly Hassan, Ziyad Yaghi and Hysen Sherifi.

Hassan and Yaghi are U.S. citizens. Sherifi, a native of Kosovo, is a legal permanent resident of the United States, according to the indictment.

The defendants, all young men in their 20s, were among seven men arrested in July 2009 on charges of conspiring to support what the indictment called “violent jihad” overseas.

Three other defendants in the case, including the plot’s ringleader, Muslim convert Daniel Patrick Boyd, and his two sons, Dylan and Zakariya Boyd, have admitted guilt to some charges as part of plea deals and are awaiting sentencing.

A final defendant, Anes Subasic, is awaiting trial.

The indictment said Boyd, a drywall contractor from Willow Spring, North Carolina, had drawn his sons and the other men into a plan to travel abroad to help Islamist militants, although prosecutors have said there was no indication they were linked to any international militant organization.

It said Boyd led what was described as a “conspiracy to murder, kidnap, maim or injure persons in a foreign country,” and that the defendants were “prepared to become ‘mujihadeen’ and die…as martyrs in furtherance of violent jihad.”

The indictment said Boyd had traveled between 1989 and 1992 to Pakistan and Afghanistan, “where he received military-style training in terrorist training camps for the purpose of engaging in violent jihad.”

It added that from at least November 2006, when the federal investigation began, through July 2009, Boyd conspired with the other defendants “to provide material support and resources to terrorists, including currency, training, transportation and personnel.”

Boyd and Sherifi were also accused of conspiring to kill U.S. military personnel “in an attack on government and military installations in Virginia and elsewhere.”

GUILTY ON CONSPIRACY COUNTS

The jury found Sherifi guilty on five counts, including three counts of conspiring to provide material support to terrorists; to murder, kidnap, maim and injure persons; and to kill a federal officer or employee. He also was convicted of two counts of possessing a firearm in furtherance of a crime of violence.

The jury found Yaghi guilty on two counts of conspiracy. Hassan was convicted on one count of conspiracy to provide material support to terrorists, but acquitted on a second count of conspiring to murder, kidnap, maim and injure people, court records show.

The government’s case was based largely on secretly recorded conversations between the defendants and statements from a confidential informant.

Mauri Saalakhan, director of the Peace Through Justice Foundation, based in the Washington D.C. area, attended closing arguments in New Bern and criticized the convictions, saying he believed they were brought about by “a post-9/11 atmosphere of fear and patriotism.”

Saalakhan said the defendants’ lawyers argued that the men had done nothing more than make provocative statements, and said in his view the government had not demonstrated an actual intent to aid or carry out acts of terrorism.

“I just feel it was a terrible miscarriage of justice that doesn’t make America any safer,” Saalakhan said. “Given the constitutional principals we stand for, this kind of victory for the government makes us less safe.”

Robin Zier, a spokeswoman for the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Raleigh, said the government would have no comment on the case due to a gag order that remained in effect on Thursday. Attempts to reach lawyers for the defendants were unsuccessful.

(Edited by Colleen Jenkins and Cynthia Johnston)

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Jury Convicts 3 North Carolina Men in Terror Trial

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By MICHAEL BIESECKER Associated Press

NEW BERN, N.C. October 13, 2011 (AP)

A federal jury convicted three North Carolina men Thursday in a trial that focused on alleged plots to carry out terrorist attacks on the U.S. Marine Corps base at Quantico, Va., and foreign targets.

The jury in the month-long trial delivered its verdict against Mohammad Omar Aly Hassan, Ziyad Yaghi and Hysen Sherifi after deliberating since Wednesday.

Yaghi and Sherifi were convicted on all counts. Hassan was found not guilty of conspiracy to carry out attacks overseas but convicted of providing material support to terrorists.

Hassan, Yaghi and Sherifi were part of a group of eight men who federal investigators say raised money, stockpiled weapons and trained in preparation for jihadist attacks against American military targets and others they deemed enemies of Islam.

Daniel Boyd, a convert to Islam whom prosecutors described as the ringleader, pleaded guilty to terrorism-related charges in February. Two of his sons pleaded guilty to similar charges.

Aly Hassan, the father of Omar Hassan, said the family would not rest until his son’s name is cleared, indicating he plans to appeal or seek a new trial.

“We’re going to stick behind him because we know he is not guilty,” Aly Hassan said. “It’s a long nightmare.”

U.S. District Court Judge Louise Flanagan said the men will be sentenced in about 90 days. The felony counts the men were convicted of carry sentences ranging from 15 years to life.

Another defendant, Anes Subasic, is set to be tried separately, while an eighth indicted man is at large and believed to be in Pakistan. All of the accused were either American-born naturalized U.S. citizens or legal permanent residents.

Prosecutors claimed at trial that Sherifi, a refugee from the Balkan nation of Kosovo, conspired with Daniel Boyd in 2009 to attack the U.S. Marine base at Quantico outside Washington, D.C.

Boyd, whose father was a Marine officer, had lived on the base as a child. At trial, prosecutors played a recording of Boyd telling a paid undercover informant how easy it would be to kill Marine officers, their wives and children. Jurors also were shown a large cache of rifles, pistols and ammunition amassed by Boyd at his rural home near Raleigh.

Hassan and Yaghi were accused of attempting to travel to Israel in 2007 to meet up with Boyd and his sons to carry out an attack. Defense lawyers and relatives said the young men traveled to tour holy sites, stay with relatives and, in Yaghi’s case, find a wife.

Defense lawyers also said none of the hundreds hours of audio recordings and video surveillance collected by the FBI in a 5-year investigation of Boyd ever captured him or his alleged co-conspirators discussing specific plans for an attack. The lawyers for the three also said the government’s case amounted to prosecuting young Muslims who did little more than watch jihadist videos on computers and trade “stupid” Facebook posts in support of those fighting Americans overseas.

The 2009 arrests of the men provoked anger and fear among some Raleigh-area Muslims, who worried their community was the subject of aggressive scrutiny by federal law enforcement after 9-11. Some members of a Raleigh mosque, along with a network of relatives and friends, regularly made the five-hour trip to New Bern to give the men moral support.

As the verdict was read Thursday, several of the women sobbed. The defendants showed no emotion.

Page 2 of 2

NEW BERN, N.C. October 13, 2011 (AP)

Leaving court Thursday, federal prosecutors and defense lawyers declined comment on the outcome, citing a continuing gag order.

Afterward, Aly Hassan said he questioned why the trial was scheduled to coincide with the 10th anniversary of the 9-11 attacks when that timing could further fan suspicions about Muslims among potential jurors. He also questioned why the judge moved the trial from Raleigh to New Bern, where the potential jury pool was less likely to be diverse and more likely to draw from communities surrounding two Marine bases.

avid Schanzer, a Duke University professor and the director of the Triangle Center on Terrorism and Homeland Security, said government investigators have uncovered relatively few terrorist plots in the past decade.

“It’s really been a much smaller problem than we had anticipated immediately after 9/11,” he said.

Since the 9-11 attacks, fewer than 200 people have been arrested in the U.S. in connection with violent, jihadi-inspired terrorist plots, he noted.

Aly Hassan, a Raleigh car dealer, said there’s no proof his son supported any terrorist conspiracy. He added: “We defend this country. If there’s anything against this country, we’ll be the first ones to fight for it.”

———

Associated Press writer Tom Breen contributed to this report from Raleigh. Biesecker can be reached at twiiter.com/mbieseck

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Three Triangle men convicted of terrorism conspiracy

Click here to find out more!

NEW BERN, N.C. — A jury on Thursday found three Triangle men guilty of conspiring to aid terrorist activities overseas.

Mohammad Omar Aly Hassan, 23, Ziyad Yaghi, 22, and Hysen Sherifi, 26, were among seven area men arrested in July 2009 on charges that they raised money to buy assault weapons and conduct training exercises. They also were accused of arranging overseas travel and contacts to help others carry out violent acts on behalf of a radical jihadist political agenda.

Jurors deliberated for about 10 hours over two days before finding all three guilty of conspiracy to provide material support to terrorists. Yaghi and Sherifi also were convicted of conspiracy to murder, kidnap, maim and injure people, but the jury acquitted Hassan on that charge.

Sherifi also was found guilty of two weapons counts and a charge of conspiracy to kill federal employees for a plot to attack the Marine base in Quantico, Va.

Relatives of the three men wept and expressed disbelief as they left the federal courthouse in New Bern.

“The truth will come. It’s a long nightmare. It’s not over,” said Hassan’s father, Aly Hassan. “Omar is innocent, and with the appeal, I’m sure he’s going to come out.”

Sherifi and Yaghi face up to life in prison when they are sentenced later, while Hassan faces up to 15 years in prison.

Aly Hassan said they were upset the trial started a week after the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks in New York and Washington, D.C.

“People came here scared,” he said. “We still love this country. We defend this country. If there’s anything again in this country, we’ll be the first people to fight for it. So, that’s why we’re so disappointed (by the verdicts).”

The government spent three weeks presenting its case against the trio, including testimony from the accused ringleader of the terror cell, Daniel Patrick Boyd, his two sons and confidential FBI informants.

Boyd pleaded guilty in February to conspiracy charges, and sons Dylan and Zakariya Boyd also have pleaded guilty in the case. All three will be sentenced later.

An FBI search of Daniel Boyd’s Willow Spring home in 2009 turned up about two dozen guns and more than 27,000 rounds of ammunition. Authorities said he and the other men trained in the weeks leading up to their arrest, practicing military tactics with armor-piercing bullets in Caswell County.

During closing arguments Tuesday, prosecutors said Hassan, Sherifi and Yaghi had a mutual understanding and an objective. They pointed to 77 phone calls between Yaghi and Daniel Boyd as evidence of a relationship and not just an acquaintance.

“What we have before us is a stark and frightening reality,” said Jason Kellhofer of the U.S. Justice Department.

Defense lawyers say the men were not privy to Daniel Boyd’s plans and the government’s case comes down to prosecuting Muslim men for debating controversial ideas within their religion and watching jihadist videos on their computers.

Hassan and Yaghi presented no evidence in their defense, while Sherifi chose to testify Monday. He dismissed audio recordings of his discussions with Daniel Boyd in which he appeared to be plotting attacks, saying he was merely translating information for others, was quoting anti-American statements made by others or was only trying to please an FBI informant who pressured him into supporting radical actions.

A seventh defendant, Anes Subasic, will have a separate trial after deciding to represent himself in court.

Authorities believe another man charged in the case, Jude Kenan Mohammad, 22, is in Pakistan. A ninth member of the group, Bajram Asllani, 30, was arrested in Kosovo last year, but the U.S. doesn’t have an extradition treaty with that country.

RELATED TOPICS: Justice DepartmentCaswell CountyDaniel Patrick BoydTerrorismFederal Bureau Of InvestigationWashington County

Copyright 2011 by Capitol Broadcasting Company. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Jury convicts 3 North Carolina men in terror trial

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2011

(Updated 3:03 pm)
By MICHAEL BIESECKER
Associated Press

Accompanying Photos

NEW BERN (AP) — A federal jury convicted three North Carolina men Thursday in a trial that focused on a plot to carry out terrorist attacks on the U.S. Marine Corps base at Quantico, Va., and foreign targets.

The jury in the month-long trial delivered its verdict against Mohammad Omar Aly Hassan, Ziyad Yaghi and Hysen Sherifi after deliberating since Wednesday. Yaghi and Sherifi were convicted on all counts. Hassan was found not guilty of conspiracy to carry out attacks overseas but convicted of providing material support to terrorists.

Hassan, Yaghi and Sherifi were part of a group of eight men who federal investigators say raised money, stockpiled weapons and trained in preparation for jihadist attacks against American military targets and others they deemed enemies of Islam.

Three other men pleaded guilty in the case earlier this year, including Daniel Boyd, a convert to Islam whom prosecutors described as the ringleader. Boyd’s two sons also pleaded guilty.

Another man, Anes Subasic, is scheduled to go on trial separately in the case. The eighth suspect is still at large and believed to be living in Pakistan.

Prosecutors claimed during the trial that Hassan and Yaghi attempted to travel to Israel in 2007 to meet up with Boyd and his sons to carry out an attack. During the closing argument, jurors were shown a large cache of rifles, pistols and ammunition amassed by Boyd at his rural home near Raleigh.

Defense lawyers said none of the hundreds of audio recordings and video surveillance collected by the FBI ever captured Boyd or his alleged co-conspirators discussing specific plans for an attack with the defendants now on trial.

The men’s lawyers said the government’s case amounted to prosecuting young Muslims who did little more than watch jihadist videos on computers and trade “stupid” Facebook posts in support of those fighting Americans overseas.

The 2009 arrests of the men provoked anger and fear among some Raleigh-area Muslims, who worried their community was subject to aggressive scrutiny by federal law enforcement. Some members of a Raleigh mosque regularly made the five-hour round trip to New Bern to offer moral support to the three defendants on trial.

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Jurors ponder terror case

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BY MICHAEL BIESECKER – ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tags: North Carolina | terror | Ziyad Yaghi | Hysen Sherifi | U.S. Marine Corps | Quantico | Va.

NEW BERN — Jury deliberation will continue for a second day in the case of three North Carolina men accused of plotting terrorist attacks on the U.S. Marine Corps base in Quantico, Va., or targets overseas.

Jurors in New Bern didn’t reach a verdict Wednesday after deliberating for nearly 7 hours. The panel of eight women and four men are scheduled resume their discussions this morning.

Mohammad Omar Aly Hassan, Ziyad Yaghi and Hysen Sherifi have all pleaded not guilty to charges that include conspiracy and weapons possession. All are either U.S. citizens or permanent legal residents.

Prosecutors say the defendants were part of a group of men led by Willow Spring construction worker Daniel Boyd who allegedly conspired and trained to carry out acts of terrorism. Boyd and his two sons pleaded guilty earlier this year to charges related to a plan to kill or kidnap people during a 2007 trip to Israel. Israeli authorities denied them entry into the country.

Attorneys for the three defendants now on trial say the federal government is targeting the young Muslim men for being guilty by acquaintance due to their friendship with Boyd and his sons. The FBI paid three informants, including an illegal Moroccan immigrant and a convicted armed robber, about $200,000 to befriend Boyd and his circle.

In a nearly five-year sting, the FBI collected about 750 hours of audio and video surveillance, including a tape of Boyd telling one of the informants how easy it would be to attack the wives and children of U.S. service members living near the Marine base. Another tape included a theological debate about whether suicide bombings are permissible under Islam.

The government, through one of its paid informants, also provided Boyd access to firearms and a rural farm where he and other members of the alleged conspiracy could be recorded shooting the weapons. Prosecutors described the target practice, as well as a separate trip to a paintball facility, as military training of jihad.

Defense lawyers say none of the surveillance records includes any of the three men agreeing to join Boyd’s plot.

In closing arguments Tuesday, the lawyers said their clients are guilty only of being acquainted with Boyd and saying “stupid” things.

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Read more: http://www.newsobserver.com/2011/10/13/1561338/jurors-ponder-terror-case.html#ixzz1agKBpBVe

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Tuesday OCT 11 2011 Final arguments

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Posted: 9:41 a.m. today
Updated: 1:34 p.m. today

Closing arguments begin in Triangle terrorism trial

Click here to find out more!

Closing arguments begin in Triangle terrorism trial

NEW BERN, N.C. — The three men accused of being members of a terrorist cell based in Johnston County were involved in a conspiracy linked to the global jihad movement and chose to align themselves with the cell’s ringleader, prosecutors said Tuesday.

Mohammad Omar Aly Hassan, 23, Ziyad Yaghi, 22, and Hysen Sherifi, 26, face multiple felony charges related to allegations they conspired to attack targets overseas. Sherifi also is accused of plotting an attack on the Marine base in Quantico, Va. Closing arguments in their case began Tuesday.

A federal indictment unsealed in 2009 alleges that they and five other Triangle men raised money to buy assault weapons and conduct training exercises and that they arranged overseas travel and contacts to help others carry out violent acts on behalf of a radical jihadist political agenda.

“What we have before us is a stark and frightening reality,” Jason Kellhofer of the U.S. Justice Department said Tuesday.

The government spent three weeks presenting its case against the trio, including testimony from the accused ringleader of the terror cell, Daniel Patrick Boyd, his two sons and confidential FBI informants.

Boyd pleaded guilty in February to federal terrorism charges. Two of his sons also have pleaded guilty to charges associated with the case. All three will be sentenced later.
An FBI search of Daniel Boyd’s Willow Spring home in 2009 turned up about two dozen guns and more than 27,000 rounds of ammunition. Authorities said he and the other men trained in the weeks leading up to their arrest, practicing military tactics with armor-piercing bullets in Caswell County.

Hassan and Yaghi presented no evidence in their defense, while Sherifi chose to testify Monday.

When prosecutors confronted Sherifi with audio recordings in which he appeared to be plotting attacks, he said he was merely translating information for others, was quoting anti-American statements made by others or was only trying to please an FBI informant, who pressured him into supporting radical actions.

Sherifi also denied going with Boyd and his sons, Dylan and Zakariya, to Caswell County for military training exercises. He said the group was only firing guns for fun and that he knows nothing about weapons.

During closing arguments, prosecutors said the three defendants had a mutual understanding and an objective. They pointed to 77 phone calls between Yaghi and Daniel Boyd as evidence of a relationship and not just an acquaintance.

The Facebook pages of Yaghi and Hassan were also mentioned. The prosecution noted that Yaghi’s favorite movies were about martyrs and that he had the quote “War is deception” on his page.

Defense lawyers say the men were not privy to Daniel Boyd’s plans and the government’s case comes down to prosecuting Muslim men for debating controversial ideas within their religion and watching jihadist videos on their computers.

Another defendant, Anes Subasic, has declined to have an attorney represent him and will be tried after the trial for the others.

Terror trial end nears: Closing arguments expected Tuesday

October 10, 2011 4:54 PM

Closing arguments are expected Tuesday in the terrorist trial in federal court in New Bern. Both the government and defense have ended presenting evidence in the trial.

As the trial entered the fourth week Monday, Hysen Sherifi took the stand and testified on his own behalf.

Sherifi faces more serious charges than two other co-defendants. He is facing a government charge of providing material support for terrorists and conspiracy to murder, kidnap, maim and injure.

Mohammad Omar Aly Hassan and Ziyad Yagi are accused of conspiracy to commit acts of terrorism. The two men did not take the witness stand.

Sherifi testified after his father and sister Monday. His father, Reshagshir Sherifi, told of coming to America from Kosovo. As the younger Sherifi traveled back and forth to Kosovo, he would work at the same plant in Apex where his father worked. The two drove back and forth from Raleigh. The elder Sherifi said he and his son never talked about jihad or committing violent acts. “The topic never came up,” he said. Reshagshir Sherifi said there were never firearms in his household. He said his son only wanted to go back to Kosovo to be with his wife.

Sister Mershia Sherifi said her brother became more religious. “We discussed religion often. He never talked about jihad until his arrest. I never knew anything about jihad, until I looked it up online,” she said.

“He never talked about fighting in any part of the world,” she said.

Hysen Sherifi testified that he used the word “jihad” often. “It means many different things in the Islamic religion,” he said.

Sherifi was captured on tape talking to three government informants. “We talked about jihad but it went in one ear and out the other,” he said. He testified that the more than 700 hours of recorded conversations were taken out of context by the government. He admitted going to Caswell County with Daniel Boyd, the ringleader of the terrorist operation, and his two sons and others. “I didn’t consider it military training; just fun firing weapons,” he said.

“(Daniel) Boyd showed me how to use guns; he would show a monkey if he went to his house,” he said.

Sherifi said he never traded in guns or talked of jihad with any of the Boyd men. He said he never intended to send or take money to Kosovo to support terrorism. He said he never intended or agreed to bomb U.S. military bases or to kill federal officers. “That is why I pleaded not guilty.”

Yagi’s and Hassan’s attorneys asked Sherifi if their clients ever had conversations about killing or maiming anyone. Sherifi said no.

“A lot of the things Daniel Boyd said, I did not take seriously. I said some stupid things, I have a big mouth,” Sherifi said.

The Boyd men have all pleaded guilty to conspiracy charges of maiming, supplying money and weapons to terrorists. They have not been sentenced and testified for the government against the three men on trial. They all said the government promised them nothing in return for their testimony, but hope they will get lighter sentences. The senior Boyd faces life plus 15 years; his sons face 15 years in prison. All defendants have been in prison since their arrests in July 2009.

http://www.enctoday.com/news/sherifi-101093-nbsj-trial-father.html

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Jury selection has begun Sept 18. 2011,

The process will move, however slowly.

Jury pool picked for terrorism trial in New Bern

September 20, 2011 10:26 AM

Sue Book

Freedom ENC

NEW BERN — A jury pool picked in federal court in New Bern on Monday will help form the jury for an estimated five-week trial of three North Carolina men charged with terrorism.

U.S. Eastern District Court Judge Louise Flanagan pressed forward past typical 5 p.m. court recess to select potential jurors for the trial of Hysen Sherifi, Mohammad Omar Aly Hassan, and Ziyad Yaghi, all of Wake County and all charged with conspiracy to provide material support for terrorists and conspiracy to murder, kidnap, maim and injure.

Sherifi, a Kosovo native and permanent resident of the U.S. who graduated from Broughton High School in Raleigh, is also charged with illegal possession of firearms and conspiracy to kill officials of the federal government.

The three men, part of a group known as the “Tar Heel terrorists” or “homegrown terrorists,” were present Monday with their attorneys – two from New Bern and one from Raleigh – in U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of North Carolina after already spending more than two years in prison.

A fourth defendant, Anes Subasic, went on trial in federal court in Greenville on Monday, where similar jury selection was in progress.

Three others charged, including suspected ring-leader Daniel Patrick “Saifullah” Boyd and his sons Zakariva “Zak” Boyd, and Dylan “Mohammed” Boyd, have already pleaded guilty to some charges in the federal indictment first filed in open court Sept. 24, 2009 and their names were among the potential witness names read to prospective jurors Monday.

An eighth defendant, Jude Kenan Mohammad, has not been apprehended.

Security was tight inside the federal court building and, after a closed door hearing of motions that lasted about an hour and 20 minutes, Flanagan brought in the first 38 potential jurors summoned to what was originally predicted to be a nine-week trial.

Flanagan told them “there is no higher honor or greater duty” than the job they are being asked to do. She admonished them “to make sure the verdict is above reproach and beyond suspicion,” they should not read, listen or speak about the case, and that includes any research or communication on the internet or any form of social media.

Attorneys were called to caucus several times following responses by jurors to a list of about 15 questions that included their age, education, employment, family status, and connections to the law enforcement, the legal system, military, 9/11, gun laws and where they got their news.

Flanagan read long lists of places and people who are apparently connected to the evidence to be presented. Some questions sought to determine whether their feelings on any of those things would impair their ability to bring a fair and impartial verdict.

Some potential jurors were excused following the huddles and others for cause at their request.

She told those accepted there would be five weeks for evidence before the trial reaches jury deliberation, based on a four-day, Tuesday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. trial day, with the schedule varied the week with Columbus Day.

It is unclear how long it will take to select the jury for the trial of those accused with terrorist activities between 2006 and 2009 or when opening arguments will begin.

And another account:

NEW BERN, N.C. — Jury selection began Monday in the federal trial of three Triangle men accused of plotting terrorist attacks.

Mohammad Omar Aly Hassan, Ziyad Yaghi and Hysen Sherifi face multiple felony charges related to allegations they conspired to attack targets overseas. Sherifi also is accused of plotting an attack on the Marine base in Quantico, Va.

A fourth defendant, Anes Subasic, has waived his right to an attorney and is representing himself. He will be tried following the conclusion of proceedings against the other three.

Security was tight at the federal courthouse in New Bern, where only one person was allowed inside at a time to go through screening. About a half-dozen people were at the courthouse to support the three defendants, who were shackled.

Prospective jurors answered questions about their background and knowledge of the case, and the defendants quietly took notes during the process.

Senior U.S. District Judge Louise Flanagan said she expects the trial to last five weeks, noting dozens of witnesses from 16 states and the nations of Egypt and Jordan could be called to testify.

Accused ringleader Daniel Patrick Boyd pleaded guilty in February to charges of conspiracy to provide material support to terrorists and conspiracy to murder, kidnap, maim and injure persons in a foreign country. His sons, Dylan and Zakariya Boyd, have also pleaded guilty to conspiracy to provide material support to terrorists.

A federal indictment unsealed in 2009 alleges that eight Triangle men raised money to buy assault weapons and conduct training exercises, and that they arranged overseas travel and contacts to help others carry out violent acts on behalf of a radical jihadist political agenda.

The indictment paints Daniel Boyd, a drywall contractor from Willow Spring, as an experienced jihadist who traveled to Afghanistan in 1989 to join the fight against Soviet occupation. Prosecutors played audio tapes at a 2009 court hearing of Daniel Boyd talking about his disgust with the U.S. military, the honor of martyrdom and the need to protect Muslims.

The FBI said its 2009 search of Boyd’s home turned up about two dozen guns and more than 27,000 rounds of ammunition. Authorities have previously said the men trained in the weeks leading up to their arrest, practicing military tactics with armor-piercing bullets in Caswell County.

Authorities believe another man charged in the case, Jude Kenan Mohammad, 22, is in Pakistan, although The Wall Street Journal recently reported that he was tied to a threatened terrorist attack in New York or Washington, D.C., on the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks.

A ninth member of the group, Bajram Asllani, 30, was arrested in Kosovo last year, but the U.S. doesn’t have an extradition treaty with that country.

>

“NC 7” Trial of

“preemptive prosecution”

Boyds and co defendants is on September 19th, 2011, at the federal courthouse in New Bern NC. [413 Middle Street, New Bern, NC]  It should start at 8am. After that, it will go through until Friday and then break on the weekend. The next weeks will only be on Tuesdays through Fridays.

<>

IMPORTANT COURT TRIAL

…. Ongoing ….

Waiting to see what actually develops

>

HEARINGS  

On “Raleigh 7″ 

“preemptive prosecution” case:

AUG 15 & 16, 2011 – 10 am

Raleigh NC courthouse

310 New Bern Avenue (7th Floor)

<>

Aug. 15, 2011
5 NC suspects in terrorism plot plead not guilty
MICHAEL BIESECKER, Associated Press

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — Five North Carolina men accused in a 2009 terrorism plot have pleaded not guilty to the charges.

Dylan Boyd, Mohammad Omar Aly Hassan, Ziyad Yaghi, Hysen Sherifi and Anes Subasic face multiple felony charges related to allegations they conspired to attack the Marine base in Quantico, Va., and targets overseas. They pleaded not guilty Monday in federal court in Raleigh.

Accused ringleader Daniel Patrick Boyd pleaded guilty in February to charges of conspiracy to provide material support to terrorists and conspiracy to murder, kidnap, maim and injure persons in a foreign country.

Zakariya Boyd later pleaded guilty to a single count of conspiracy to provide material support to terrorists. Daniel Boyd is the father of Dylan and Zakariya Boyd.

A jury trial is scheduled to start next month.
Associated Press
Copyright 2011 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

<>

Boyd Family Trust

Checks and money orders for Boyd Family Trust (to help pay monthly bills since all their bread earners are incarcerated) can be sent payable to:

The Boyd Family Trust

P.O. Box 1973

Garner, NC 27529

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Part of a recent letter about Daniel Boyd’s experiences in solitary confinement, after being moved from Piedmont Regional Jail in VA, to Wake County Jail in NC for the Dec 17, 2009, hearing.

To Quote

“…Last night he had a warm cell, lights off at night, a window to look out of and a blanket that actually covered his body—all of this for the first time since August 7th. Alhamdulillah!

He was allowed a phone call this morning and said that he witnessed the sun’s dawn for the first time in four and a half months, and it was a beautiful sight. He said if we could close our eyes for nearly five months and then open them and see such a sight we might appreciate what he saw. He reminded us to be grateful for the “small” things in life….”

End Quote

Please reflect upon this:

Not seeing the sun for months, sleep deprivation, isolation and solitary hermit-like existence in a “hole”, etc etc, all while waiting trial in which one may be proved innocent of the charges ,,,,

It could happen – it does happen –  to a lot us small people without connections who are persecuted for their class, color, ethnicity, and political and religious beliefs.

<> Action Alert : Court Hearing Date on Dec 17, 2009

Show your support however you can, if even with your sincere supplications for their safety and release

Next hearing at:

Terry Sanford Federal Building & U.S. Courthouse
310 New Bern Avenue
Raleigh, NC 27601

Actually, there is not much new to report,

just that there are zillions of pages

for the defense lawyers to read

and the trial is still far away, possibly in the fall of 2011,

or later, and God knows best.

And these dates have a way of being delayed, and when there is an exact date we will post it , inshallah, (by the will of Allah).

<>

Judge delays trial of Triangle terrorism suspects

Raleigh, N.C. — A federal judge on Friday postponed the trial date for seven Triangle men accused of terrorist activities until September 2011.

Daniel Patrick Boyd, 39, his sons, Dylan Boyd, 22, and Zakariya “Zak” Boyd, 20, and four other men – Hysen Sherifi, 24, Mohammad Omar Aly Hassan, 22, Ziyad Yaghi, 21, and Anes Subasic, 33 – were indicted in July on charges that they plotted to murder, kidnap, maim and injure people overseas.

An eighth suspect, Jude Kenan Mohammad, 20, is believed to be in Pakistan.

Daniel Boyd and Sherifi also are charged with planning an attack on the Marine Corps base in Quantico, Va.

The trial had been scheduled to start on Sept. 27, but Chief U.S. District Judge Louise Flanagan decided to delay the trial to Sept. 19, 2011, after several defendants asked for more time to prepare for trial.

Defense attorneys have complained that the evidence turned over by prosecutors is very disorganized. They also said the volume of the evidence in the case – the FBI taped about 750 hours of conversations between the men and seized about two dozen computers – and the fact that they need to interview witnesses overseas necessitated a delay in the trial.

“This terrorism prosecution has revealed itself as so unusual and complex due to the nature of the prosecution and the existence of novel questions of fact and law that, under the circumstances now presented, it is unreasonable to expect adequate preparation for pretrial proceedings or for the trial itself within the time limits established by the (Speedy Trial) Act,” Flanagan wrote in her ruling.

Copyright 2010 by Capitol Broadcasting Company. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

<>

See also the Facebook group:

“Free Daniel Boyd and the rest of the NC 7″

http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=116947673481&ref=search

http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=116947673481&ref=search&sid=1175373409.2096436565..1

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Please Support Ziyad Yaghi

http://www.freeziyadyaghi.blogspot.com

Laila Yaghi Ziyad Yaghi is a 21 year old American Muslim of Palestinian descent who was born in Jordan after his parents left Upstate N.Y for a job over seas. Ziyad and his parents then came back to Upstate N.Y when he was about 2 years old. When Ziyad was about 3 years old, he moved to NC with his mom and brother.
Ziyad is known as a kind and gentle person by family, friends and colleagues. He is always giving money to the homeless and any one that asks him for money, Ziyad will give him or her the last dollar in his pocket.
The FBI and media have tried to depict my son as someone evil when in reality he’s soft, gentle and caring. He sticks his neck out for his friends and is always helping people in need.
My son is a now a victim of the FBI’s oppression.

About two years ago when Ziyad was only 19, him and his friend went overseas to his home country and from there, Ziyad and his friend also visited Egypt and had a wonderful time and then came back to the US. Soon after their trip overseas, the FBI was knocking on my door and asking me questions. When Ziyad and his friend came back, they were constantly harassed and watched by the FBI.
Before Ziyad and his friend went to Jordan they knew a specific person of interest to the FBI for a short while, then when they came back and had no contact with this person, the FBI continued to harass my son and his friend and they tried to pressure them to say something, even though Ziyad and his friend had nothing to say. Both boys insisted that they didn’t know anything personal about the person the FBI were conducting an investigation on and couldn’t understand what the FBI was looking for!

Two years later, a simple fight broke between the boys and one of the friends of Ziyad The FBI made it sound so horrendous and tried to charge Ziyad and his friend with many things and threw them in jail. The FBI came once more to my door and asked me more questions and then one of them told me that he wants the boys in jail because he wants them to feel more pressured to tell them something about the individual the FBI have been inquiring about earlier. Again that same name was mentioned and the boys stayed in jail almost four months and when the FBI found that there is nothing against these boys that could prove what they were looking for, my son and his friend were released.

After two moths, when my son had cleaned the apartment for me and was about to cook, he went to the pool for a short swim, the FBI came with a swat team and arrested my son with new charges! The charges were so absurd! Ziyad and his friend were charged with conspiring to kill and maim people abroad! The FBI two days later came to my apartment to give me my son’s swimming shorts and told me that they think Ziyad knows something about the person they’ve been inquiring about from the beginning and that “Ziyad is not telling us and that he needs to cooperate with us!” Interestingly, one of the FBI officers told me and some of Ziyad’s friends that he it trying to get promoted. So can you see how the FBI works? Takes innocent people from their homes and throws them in jail for no wrong doing? Where is the justice here? Why would my son be taken away for no reason? I cannot explain the pain I’ve been feeling since July and I’ve been in deep depression crying all the time because of the injustice done to my son and many other Muslims in America.

We are a normal American family. This is outrageous! We are only being targeted because we are Muslims. We have done nothing wrong! Nothing wrong! Ziyad has a kind heart; he is someone that refuses to kill ants so how is he going to kill humans?

Please Support Ziyad and take a step in bringing an end to the Oppression done to my Son and many others. Silence is not an option in helping the oppressed, rather is it merely defeatism. We NEED to speak out and take ACTION to end these nightmares.

Yours respectfully,
Laila Yaghi

http://www.facebook.com/topic.php?uid=212624343942&topic=12141#!/group.php?gid=212624343942

Laila Yaghi For the love of God, sign the petition and free an innocent boy and send him back home to his mom
http://www.petitiononline.com/mod_perl/signed.cgi?GVFJAHR&1

Signatures on the FREE Ziyad Yaghi Petition to U.S District Court.

My Story by Laila Yaghi

Laila Yaghi is the mother of Ziyad Yaghi, a young man who was arrested on terrorism charges along with the “NC 17.”  She maintains that he is innocent of all charges.  There’s a “sticky” on the front page that has a link to a petition as well as a donate button.  Please help as much as you can.  Pass the petition around, please.

http://freedetainees.org/category/ziyad-yaghi

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Islam is obedient and loving submission to Allah the One and Only Lord and God of all creation, and the peace, bliss, security and salvation that this submission brings by the grace of Allah

<> The truth will set you free


Please Write Letters of Support

for those in

Solitary Confinement and/or Imprisonment

Daniel Boyd is still in Solitary Confinement: he is only let out of cell for 1/2 hour three times a week, and must take any quick shower with handcuffs .

Daniel is in

Now they are incarcerated at follow addresses:

Daniel Patrick Boyd [no. 166172]

Public Safety Center

PO Box 2419

Raleigh NC 27602


All the others are at the following address:

175 Bain Street
P. O. Box 399 (Mailing)
Lillington, NC 27546-0399

2 Responses to ACTION ALERTS

  1. Pingback: A chance to write to Daniel Boyd and co.

  2. Pingback: GVFJ | North Carolina 8 Campaign

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